HTH: What We Can Learn About Community & Loneliness from PTSD

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This excerpt comes from an unlikely source, here on the Rooted blog. In the June 2015 issue of Vanity Fair, the magazine pens this article about PTSD. Two paragraphs talk about how isolated war veterans feel when coming back to American society. They have come from a situation where they are sharing intense experiences with other soldiers and living collectively. When they return to American, they encounter intense disconnection and loneliness. This article puts good language on the isolation teenagers may feel and may offer some good quotes when talking about the disconnection created through technology and performance-oriented lives.

“There are obvious psychological stresses on a person in a group, but there may be even greater stresses on a person in isolation. Most higher primates, including humans, are intensely social, and there are few examples of individuals surviving outside of a group. A modern soldier returning from combat goes from the kind of close-knit situation that humans evolved for into a society where most people work outside the home, children are educated by strangers, families are isolated from wider communities, personal gain almost completely eclipses collective good, and people sleep alone or with a partner. Even if he or she is in a family, that is not the same as belonging to a large, self-sufficient group that shares and experiences almost everything collectively. Whatever the technological advances of modern society—and they’re nearly miraculous—the individual lifestyles that those technologies spawn may be deeply brutalizing to the human spirit.”

Join us for Rooted 2015, an intimate youth ministry conference, where we will explore how the good news of God coming to mankind in the person of Jesus Christ offers student ministers and teenagers, hope, healing and connectedness. 

Also to learn more about gospel centered youth ministry, check more articlesfrom Rooted’s youth ministry blog. 

 

 

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